Multiple introductions, admixture and bridgehead invasion characterize the introduction history of Ambrosia artemisiifolia in Europe and Australia.

van Boheemen, L. A., Lombaert, E., Nurkowski, K. A., Gauffre, B., Rieseberg, L. H., & Hodgins, K. A. Multiple introductions, admixture and bridgehead invasion characterize the introduction history of Ambrosia artemisiifolia in Europe and Australia. Molecular Ecology.
Admixture between differentiated populations is considered to be a powerful mechanism stimulating the invasive success of some introduced species. It is generally facilitated through multiple introductions; however, the importance of admixture prior to introduction has rarely been considered. We assess the likelihood that the invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia populations of Europe and Australia developed through multiple introductions or were sourced from a historical admixture zone within native North America. To do this, we combine large genomic and sampling datasets analyzed with approximate scenarios with pre- and post-introduction admixture simultaneously. We show the historical admixture zone within native North America originated before global invasion of this weed, and could act as a potential source of introduced populations. We provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that the invasive populations established through multiple introductions from the native range into Europe and subsequent bridgehead invasion into Australia. We discuss the evolutionary mechanisms that could promote invasiveness and evolutionary potential of alien species from bridgehead invasions and admixed source populations.
Publications
Rapid And Repeated Local Adaptation To Climate In An Invasive Plant

van Boheemen, L. A., Atwater, D. Z., & Hodgins, K. A. (2018). Rapid And Repeated Local Adaptation To Climate In An Invasive Plant. New Phytologist  doi.org/10.1111/nph.15564 Biological invasions provide opportunities to study evolutionary processes occurring over contemporary timescales. To explore the speed and repeatability of adaptation, we examined the divergence of …

Publications
EICA Fails As An Explanation Of Growth And Defence Evolution Following Multiple Introductions

van Boheemen, L.A., Bou-Assi, S., Uesugi, A., Hodgins, K.A. (2018). EICA Fails As An Explanation Of Growth And Defence Evolution Following Multiple Introductions. bioRxiv  doi.org/10.1101/435271 Rapid adaptation is aiding invasive populations in their competitive success. The evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis posits this enhanced performance results from escape from native enemies, yet its …

Publications
Compensatory and additive helper effects in the cooperatively breeding Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis).

van Boheemen, L. A., Hammers, M., Kingma, S. A., Richardson, D. S., Burke, T., Komdeur, J., & Dugdale, H. L. (2018). Compensatory and additive helper effects in the cooperatively breeding Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis). Ecology & Evolution https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.4982 In cooperatively breeding species, helper aid may affect dominant breeders investment trade-offs …